My Tipping Point on Wattpad

It has been nearly five months since I last talked about Wattpad. Yikes!!

Sadly, at the very moment things began to take off for my book on Wattpad, I also entered one of the craziest seasons of my life — my first semester as a Middle School English teacher. It was all I could do to keep updating my story, and my blog updates got brushed aside.

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But now things are finally settling down, so I have to share what’s happened.

In the past 5 months, my fantasy, THE SHADOW WATCH, went from 8K reads to 106K reads! The first 8K reads took four months. Now, I am averaging 1K reads per day. Ironically, I was also far more active on threads and reading other people’s work when my reads were lower.

I felt I had a good story going, but needless to say, I was blown away when the reads started compounding.

For those of you just getting started, keep at it! I believe that if your writing is of quality and you post regularly, you will get noticed in time. Being more active last fall probably would have helped my cause further, but such is life…

Today, I thought I would share about my tipping points on Wattpad. Points when my readership suddenly shot up to a new level, and the book became more visible.

THE MAGICAL 10,000 READS!

Up until August, my reads averaged around 100 a day. At that time, I was posting at least twice a week. The day I crossed the 10K read mark changed things. I had 500 reads that day, and began averaging between 200-600 reads nearly every day that month. There were some outlier slow days. But simply crossing that threshold seemed to make my book more clickable, as I hadn’t changed anything else. All of a sudden, the reads and votes came flooding in at a much higher rate. I had more reads in August than I’d had altogether before that.

In September, I was forced to slow down my twice-a-week chapter posting schedule due to my crazy workload. Yet, still the reads held. Each month, the reads increased, but generally, I averaged somewhere around 400-600 reads per day for the entire fall.

I finished posting the book at the beginning of November. By that time, I had reached 50K reads. I was so burnt out from work and trying to keep up with writing, I hardly showed my face on Wattpad until mid-December, other than to respond to reader comments every couple weeks. In spite of the inactivity, my reads continued to hold.

That brings me to my next tipping point…

90K Craziness

I had begun to think my book had reached a threshold it would not pass until I managed to get the book featured on Wattpad (sadly, a few days ago, I discovered that my August application did not go through correctly, so that will have to wait). But this proved untrue.

After about 3 months of the same 500 reads or so a day, by the end of December my reads reached 90K. On Dec. 28, after crossing 90K, I had my first 1K read day. I have had 1K + reads every day since (minus one 900 day).

This has proven to be yet again, a tipping point for THE SHADOW WATCH.

While, I would not go so far as to argue this is the rule of Wattpad, for me, hitting those two points marked sudden, sharp increases in reads that held steady afterwards. I wonder what the next tipping point is?

I hope this is helpful to you! I have written a couple posts about the benefits of posting to Wattpad, benefits that I saw before I attained any level of success. And they hold true.

I have received no calls from agents due to hitting 100K reads on Wattpad. I know people who are pushing 1M reads, and are still having trouble finding representation in the traditional world. I have a friend who had a Featured Book with 200K+ reads who decided to self-publish and is seeing awesome results on Amazon now. I am working on a new draft of TSW at the moment, and plan to query some agents in the next couple months, and we’ll see what happens.

I do not think Wattpad is a path to publication, at least not typically. And I would still discourage people from approaching it with that mindset.

But I will say that it is a great experience to have your work read and loved by readers of your genre. Posting to Wattpad helped me finish THE SHADOW WATCH much faster than I probably would have. It also helped me keep the tension high throughout the book (a post for another day). Hitting those milestones (the first 2K reads, the first 10K, and the first 100K) have all been huge confidence boosts for my writing.

We’ll see what 2017 holds for TSW, both on and off Wattpad.

But either way, it was a great decision to try posting it there, and I personally would recommend giving it a try. At the very least, I guarantee you will connect with some cool people.

 

Keep on writing!

Stephen

 

Getting Readers on Wattpad

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That’s why you’re thinking about posting your story on Wattpad, right? Everyone wants to have their story read. But how do you get people to read a new story on a site that has literally millions of stories?

There are stories on Wattpad with millions of views and thousands of votes, and it can be really disheartening when your story has only a few dozen reads and four votes.

I have been posting my fantasy THE SHADOW WATCH regularly on Wattpad for about 7 weeks now. I am at 2,300 reads and about 400 votes. In the scheme of things on Wattpad, that’s nothing spectacular. But it has been steadily building, and that is the biggest thing to remember. Hitting 1K reads was a sweet spot that seemed to boost daily readership. Your story begins looking like one worth checking out.

But how to get there?

The other day, I was reading Taran Matharu’s account of posting his story, Summoner: The Novice. He posted daily during NaNoWriMo and reached a million reads in about three months. Incredible! But that is not usually the case, at all, and I just started feeling a bit discouraged, really, because that would be so cool, but that is soo not what has been happening.

But, here’s a truth, even the most successful authors on Wattpad typically go through the slog of building readership over many months.

I currently average about 50-100 reads a day on my story, and anywhere from 5 to 30 votes, typically from around 10 unique readers, and I have spent the last month on the Fantasy Hot List, typically in the top 300 or 400.  Again, nothing crazy. But when I think back to being desperate for a single vote or read when I first started posting, it is actually not too bad.

I have about a dozen or so really dedicated readers, at the moment. Ones who read chapter updates right away and enthusiastically comment (a couple have been with me since the first postings, which is pretty cool) and chat about the story. But you will find these are few and far between. When you get them, treat them well. Thank them often. Dedicate chapter to them. Maybe follow them. 

The majority of Wattpad readers are “silent readers.” Meaning they don’t vote on every chapter (or not at all), nor do they comment, but every now and then one will thank me for posting the story, etc. A little frustrating when you want votes, but you will find that the people who care about votes and comments are typically writers, and the majority of your readers won’t say much, because they just want to read. But hey, someone is still taking the time to read your stuff, and that is awesome, so don’t knock on silent readers. If they interact at all, thank them for taking the time to read your stuff.

*An aside — Don’t be that person who sends messages to followers about how they wish people would vote and comment and quit being silent. No one likes that person.*

 

So how do you build readership, then?

 

Well, I am assuming your story is already top quality, with no grammar mistakes, complex characters, and wonderful tension! No? Then, edit and make sure it’s good before posting. Obviously, if you have major structural flaws, you will have trouble getting noticed (unless you are writing One Direction fan fiction, then it seems anything goes).

There is no exact formula to building readership on Wattpad, but I truly believe these things will help everyone. They have worked for me, and are what I see successful writers doing.

 

  1. COVER! COVER! COVER! —  Don’t throw a crappy cover up and wonder why no one is clicking on your story. Find someone who can make a decent one. Deviant Art is a good place to look, as well as the Design forums on Wattpad. There are people who will make you a cover in exchange for you dedicating a chapter to them, or reading and commenting on a couple chapters of their story. Pretty good deal! Get a decent cover before you post anything.
  2. BLURB! — Maybe I will write more about the blurb sometime, but for now, look up what you should include in the blurb, and check out the blurbs of popular stories on Wattpad. What makes them stand out? Be sure to highlight your Main Character and the main conflict quickly. Unless people click on your story, they will only see the first few lines, so make them juicy. Don’t give us paragraphs of worldbuilding or description. Give us tension and make us need to find out what will happen in the story.
  3. POST REGULARLY! — This is one of the biggest things you can do to help yourself build momentum early. I would recommend 2-3 updates a week as you start out. Every time you post, your readers receive push notifications on their phones and an email, that reminds them 2-3 times a week that your story is there and is updating. Also, the more they have to read, the more votes and comments you can get. Don’t post all at once! But steadily put it out there. If possible set a definite schedule. I post every Monday and Friday. My followers and readers know when the new chapters come out and can depend on it.
  4. INTERACT WITH THE READERS YOU HAVE! — I don’t care if you have one reader or a hundred or more. Respond to every comment. Thank people when they vote for your story. Even the top writers do this. Have someone who comments on your story a lot? Why not dedicate a chapter to them. It will make them feel more invested in the story.
  5. BE PATIENT! — It will probably not happen overnight. Just keep at it! While you’ve got time, read other people’s work. See what they do. Get involved on the forums. There are lots of great people there. There are forums for Undiscovered writers. Why not see if some of them want to trade feedback? You may find a new reader who will stick with you the whole way, and you may find out you need to fix some things in those opening chapters.

 

A Couple Freebies

These aren’t necessarily what everyone does, but I picked up some readers through them.

  1. ENTER A CONTEST — Got an awesome story? Why not enter a contest? There are many on Wattpad. For Fantasy and Sci-Fi writers, there is an awesome group called FANTASCI that holds awesome contests regularly and are hosted by top writers on the site in the genre. I connected with a couple top-notch writers through this, and also found some dedicated readers, based on a blurb and cover contest. It is a chance to stand out, because the contests are not based on current readership, just quality writing.
  2. FORUMS — I know I’ve said it before, but seriously, connect with other writers. The community is very supportive. Make friends. Are you undiscovered? Go to the forums, and connect with others? You a romance writer? Connect with other romance writers. Don’t promote yourself! Just chat and connect. Maybe check out some of their stories. But in the long run, this will serve you well.

 

Some Don’ts

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  1. Don’t create fake accounts and get fake votes and comments on your story.
  2. Don’t mass follow people in hopes they’ll follow you back, and especially don’t mass follow writers, because it is annoying.
  3. Don’t troll around begging for reads. You just look desperate.

 

 

Okay, that is all for now. I am still new to the site. But I am pleased with my progress and am excited to see how the momentum continues to build.

 

You a Wattpadder? What works for you? What doesn’t? Was this helpful?

 

Let me know in the comments!

 

And hey, feel free to follow me on Wattpad: S.A. Klopfenstein

 

And if you care to check out my fantasy story, THE SHADOW WATCH, you can read it here: THE SHADOW WATCH

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Posting a Story on Wattpad

I am beginning a new blog series discussing my experience on Wattpad. If any of you are using the social writing and reading site, I would love to dialogue about it.

If you are new to Wattpad, it is a website where thousands upon thousands of writers post stories or novels, typically serially, for free for readers around the world to read. The majority of readers are teens and young adults, largely female, and the content includes high-quality novels that have gone on to be published as well as many lower quality fan fiction stories, etc. The most popular genres are fantasy, science fiction, romance, and fan fiction, though there are markets for most genres.

I approached the site warily at first, throwing up a few sample chapters of an old story about a year ago, to gauge reader reactions, with no fanfare. Meanwhile, other complete stories were garnering millions of reads.

The more I read up on the site, the more I realized I was approaching the site wrong. It is a social network focused on writing and reading. Some writers find great success, and go on to commercial or self publication with much success.

My experience with other writing sites hasn’t been the best. I’ve found most of the time they are designed for other writers, who are reading your work hoping for you to give them feedback. This can be helpful for critique. But if you are a YA writer like me, you wonder how real teens will like your story, versus writers trading critique-reads.

If building readership and engaging with real readers is what you want, then Wattpad may be the site for you.

As I worked on a new project, I decided to test the waters, and really give the site a go. I have begun posting chapters serially for my new fantasy THE SHADOW WATCH.

I am only a couple weeks in, and I have quickly found some amazing readers who have left lovely comments and cannot wait for the next chapter. Every day, that number increases. I have experienced nothing like it yet as an unpublished author. You get in-line feedback and reactions from real readers, reading your story because it sounded interesting to them.

Here are a few tips I’ve discovered so far, in order to stand out on the site and build readership:

  1. Your cover — you need to have a good, professional looking cover. There are so many stories with bad covers that you will immediately stand out.
  2. Follow readers in your genre — Wattpad lists users who have works written or lists of books they are reading. I follow readers who have followed other fantasy writers. Many of them have added my book to their lists and enjoyed it. I try not to follow writers unless I am reading their work and want their updates.
  3. Post polished work — Wattpad is not like other writer sites, where you post for critiques. You may get some, but readers are looking for professional-looking stories.
  4. Interact with your readers — Wattpad is a social network. Consider it more like Twitter. If someone takes the time to follow you or add your work to their lists, thank them. If they comment, write back.
  5. Give your readers a schedule — I post every Monday and Friday. Readers know as soon as they finish the latest chapter when they can read the next one. It also gives you a deadline and readers who will be letdown if you don’t meet it.
  6. Read the works of other writers — Check out what some of the most successful writers are doing on the site. How long are their chapters? Do they give readers a call to action? Do they dialogue with readers? You will learn what works, and you will also read some quality stories. Like I said, many top-rated stories find great success beyond Wattpad.

All right, that is all for now. I will be sharing more tips and sharing more experiences soon.

If you are on Wattpad, what have you found works for you? How do you use the site?

 

If you are interested in reading my fantasy, THE SHADOW WATCH, check it out here:

 

Looking at Your Writing from a New Perspective (Breaking Writer’s Block)

It has been a while since I’ve written. For a number of reasons, but largely because I have been busy and I have been stuck.

I know, I know. The age-old excuses.

But they plague us all, don’t they?

I work full time and I am a full time graduate student. So time is tight. But everyone’s time is tight. As Stephen King advises, sometimes you just have to sit your @$$ in the chair and just do the work, but sometimes it is a whole lot easier to make yourself get in the chair, let alone accomplish anything in said chair. To be honest, I can usually make time for my writing when I am pumped about a project.

In comes excuse number two, being stuck. For the first time in months I am writing daily and loving it. I wrote a novel a while back and tried to publish it. I got some offers, but nothing I was crazy about. Considered self-publishing, and realized I wasn’t happy enough with the book to put it out there. (Funny how if you think about doing all that editing and marketing on your own, you realize the story might need work,)

So I’ve been in the quagmire of serious re-writing. But I kept getting bogged down with the old story, and as a result, I was never quite happy with any of the new stuff.

I played around with a couple other projects but was bored for the most part. Nothing was really taking off, and I couldn’t quite let go of the last novel.

Finally, I set my butt in the chair again and started brainstorming a totally new novel. It incorporated some ideas from my old novel and some of the ideas from the re-writes, but it was an entirely new story, a new world. I came at the writing from a truly new perspective.

And the story has taken off, I am excited to say. I am waking early to sit my butt in that chair and write. I am staying up late after the homework is done to write.

Sometimes you have to look at things from a new perspective. Try another genre or writing style or whatever it is.

Mix things up.

If what you are writing is not exciting you, perhaps there is a reason, and you’ve got to embrace that reason rather than try to hide from it. If you are having anxiety attacks over sitting your butt in the chair, maybe it’s time for a new project.

Now, everyday is not going to be fun, of course. But if your excitement and joy are gone for weeks or months, maybe it’s time to try something new and different.

This is true for writing, and maybe for life in general.

Sometimes we need a new perspective. Sometimes we need to try something a little different. It might just reignite our passion.

It did for me, anyway.

Finding a Writer’s Voice

My earliest memories of writing are from grade school, tracing the forms of letters on perforated outlines before graduating to attempt them freehand; then, on to short sentences — See Dick Run sorts of things. At the time, penmanship was still a virtue, and we students had uncomfortable little rubber insets on our pencils to produce better writing posture in our fingers. I don’t remember a particular emotion, positive or negative, toward writing in those formative years. It was a task, like most things school-related. Writing exercises were like memorizing sums in their mundane repetitiousness. But they were expected, so my feelings remained rather neutral on the matter.

Sentences grew into paragraphs. Eventually we had to start assembling the monstrous things on our own. Transcribing transformed into regurgitating information: the short answer response to a prompt, such as why such-and-such happened a certain way. It was based on what one remembered from the assigned text, and was required, so I regurgitated.

It was not until middle school, somewhere between diagramming subjects and predicates, identifying gerunds and –ly words, that I was assigned a creation all my own. This had no prompt, involved no recollection of information. It was pure and sweet inspiration: creative writing.

I was assigned a short story, five to ten pages, with the presumption that no one would come close to the end of that limit. I remember feeling a little daunted, but I had recently thought of an idea and decided to try it out. The story was about a sleepwalking serial killer. A calm, quiet citizen and a good father, he had no idea of his heinous capacities upon entering slumber. He was caught, of course, and put on trial, and there was a moral question of whether a man could be rightfully convicted for crimes originating in a dream world. In the end the man was put to death by lethal injection. To be honest, it was a terrible story. The elements of potential were there, but I had no capacity to accomplish what I wanted. Ten pages were nowhere near enough, and I hurried the ending to meet the requirements of the assignment. I finished feeling it was okay at best. But my mother, who also happened to be my teacher, upon reading it, compared it to a thriller she’d been reading. She said she could not put my story down.

I wrote little outside school essays after that. I don’t recall another creative fiction assignment. I got great grades on papers and assumed I was a decent writer, but it was just a credit to my ability to complete tasks. I had ideas for a couple stories, and once wrote an opening chapter, only to realize I was in over my head.

But my freshman year of college, things changed. My Composition professor was a creative writer, a master of essays as well as fiction. I wrote several narrative essays, about baseball, summers working on a ranch, a horse dying in my arms. And he loved them. He would read them to the class and note the power of my personal insights. I was simply making sense of my high school years and how they formed me, but my professor was subtly telling me I had something worth saying. I was not recalling another’s ideas; they were all my own, my thoughts, and they were valuable. They were worth jotting down.

I have been compelled to write ever since. I focused on writing and journalism as a result of that Composition course, and a year or so later, I dared to jump off the high dive, and tackle one of the many fictional stories running circles through my brain. I took creative writing classes to keep me at it. It took me several years to figure out how to finish the beast known as the novel, but I managed it. I write almost daily in some form or another, though never as much as I would like. Be it the narrative essay or fiction, for me there is something beautiful about taking an idea from my head and seeing it come alive on the page, to see sense made out of the recollection of an experience from childhood. I write now because I love it, because it helps me make sense of the world and of myself. And I write because I must.

It is likely, without the praise of key individuals I might not have grown to love writing. It might have remained a task, neither good nor bad, just expected. First I had to write something. Then, someone had to tell me I had something worth writing about. Then, I had to keep at it.

The voice burns from within first. But I think it is always fueled by the breath of others. But once a voice is unveiled, it is a power unlike any other.

Beginning with the End of the Story in Mind

E. L. Doctorow compared writing to driving. You know where your destination is, but you can only see as far as your headlights. At first I thought this promoted flying-by-the-seat-of-your-pants writing. But I don’t really think it is. I think it is true we can’t always see how things are going to come together as we are writing, entirely. However, there should be (has to be) a destination. Perhaps, you will find a shortcut, or you will take the scenic route. Perhaps you will near the destination and realize that you ought to stop somewhere else.

But you’ve got to know where you are headed. Effective businesses have a mission statement, a primary goal. Effective people have goals for their lives. A good book has to have a goal too.

Knowing where you are headed is key before you set out to tackle anything you write. Perhaps you’ve got to write a little to figure it out, or do some writing exercises or brainstorming. Sometimes you’ve just got to sit back and think about it. In fact, I would argue that one of the most important parts of the writing process is simply thinking about the story, sorting things out in your head a bit before you set out on the journey.

You could just start writing, just like I could just start driving down the road and seeing where I end up. But most likely I would waste a lot of miles and gas. What a shame to write half a book and realize you’ve got to go back and totally re-start the story, because the direction has changed! Believe me, I have been there. It is tough to throw something out you’ve worked hard on. I could have saved hours upon hours if I had thought things through more before writing.

Don’t neglect the planning time. Spend some time with it, have fun with it, embrace it. Think about what your characters are like and what the story-world is like. Jot down a chapter if you need to. But figure out what the real story is, and figure out what the goal, the endpoint, of the story is. You will discover all kinds of things along the way, but if there is no destination, it will be wandering and rambling.

Begin with the end and then move forward. Every scene you write will be more effective the first time around, and you will assuredly reach the destination faster.

George R.R. Martin on Outlining Before You Write (or Not)

It is Friday, and so it is time for a quote from a famous writer.

There are people on both sides of the outlining approach to writing. George R.R. Martin describes it this way:

I’ve always said there are – to oversimplify it – two kinds of writers. There are architects and gardeners. The architects do blueprints before they drive the first nail… the gardeners just dig a hole and plant the seed and see what comes up. I think all writers are partly architects and partly gardeners, but they tend to one side or another.

In another interview he clarifies which way he tends toward:

I hate outlines. I have a broad sense of where the story is going; I know the end, I know the end of the principal characters, and I know the major turning points and events from the books, the climaxes for each book, but I don’t necessarily know each twist and turn along the way. That’s something I discover in the course of writing and that’s what makes writing enjoyable. I think if I outlined comprehensively and stuck to the outline the actual writing would be boring.

Ultimately, there is no right way for this. Figure out what works for you. There are great and successful writers from both camps. However, I think Martin hits it on the head, that there is no one way without the other, but merely tendencies toward one or the other.

There are many who might think themselves purists, or fly-by-the-seat-of-their-pants writers, or organic writers, or whatever. These writers tend to demonize outlining, and often planning, period. I used to side a lot more with that camp.

Writing this way is fun and exploratory, I suppose. It also churned out a really rambling and crappy first draft. I started developing more plot points that I was writing toward, because I realized things needed more focus, and the writing got better. Lately I have been studying plot and structure and the things that are known to be present in good fiction. The things that make good plot points, and ways to make my writing tighter.

I don’t know if I will ever be an all out outliner. I think I would tend to agree with Martin that to do this entirely would take the fun out of the writing. However, especially as a writer in progress, I think really thinking through and *gasp* planning out those plot points and major events, and maybe even some ways of getting there can be really beneficial. No matter what, you will probably discover many things, regardless of the plan. But good plots have structure.

Don’t just jump in and hope for the best, though. Most great works happen with a lot of planning, a lot of hard work, and, yes, discoveries along the way. But most likely you won’t have one without the other.

Why Writers Write

Probably the best way to learn how to write better is by listening to writers, or reading stories they wrote. So I’ve decided to start a new weekly post with writing advice from other writers who have things mostly figured out. At any rate, a lot of people read their work.

Here is the first:

It is the deepest desire of every writer, the one we never admit or even dare to speak of: to write a book we can leave as a legacy. And although it is sometimes easy to forget, wanting to be a writer is not about reviews or advances or how many copies are printed or sold. It is much simpler than that, and much more passionate. If you do it right, and if they publish it, you may actually leave something behind that can last forever.

ALICE HOFFMAN

It can be really easy to get caught up with what I would call “lesser lovers,” when it comes to writing. Those desires to be published or to hit the New York Times bestseller list or get rave reviews, they are not bad desires in any respect and can spur us to be better writers. But ultimately, I agree with Alice Hoffman. Even more deeply, the reason we pour our souls into these words and keep taking rejection and risking the despair that the work may be for nothing, is this: we hope to write something great, something people will love to read, something that will last for years and years and impact readers for generations.

Don’t settle for the lesser love as you set out to write. Don’t forget the other reasons entirely, but always remember why you are writing, deep down. The reason you are even afraid to admit. Write with regards to the lesser desires. But let that deepest desire guide your writing more than anything else. And someday, maybe next year, maybe in twenty years, you will write that magnum opus, that lasting work.

Write to that end.

The Writer and the Human Inside (Writing for an Audience and Being True to Yourself)

I have found that I can be a bit of a shapeshifter. Not like a werewolf, but a shifter of personality depending on the people I am around. Like an actor, or a party-goer with many different masks, I can change. Sometimes it is evident in the things I say, or don’t say. Sometimes the things I do. Sometimes the things I write.

Have you ever been around old high school or college friends, and suddenly you realize you are acting and talking like you did then?

Two-men-on-Spacehoppers-001I read a book called Scary Close not long ago about building more intimate relationships with others. It was largely focused on romantic relationships, but it also delved into friendships too. The author, Don Miller, talked about discovering the sort of “writer person” persona he developed out of a desire to be liked. In social settings he would jump at the chance to tell someone what he did for a living, because it would make people find him more interesting. This mentality of people-pleasing also affected his writing, and after writing a successful memoir, he began to write what his audience would generally expect and like. He played it safe basically and didn’t take risks, and also didn’t convey his true thoughts or full thoughts oftentimes.

I find myself doing things like this. Wanting to be the person the people around will like. Keeping silent when I disagree with someone about religion or politics, because I want them to like me. (And also because people who talk about religion or politics generally aren’t looking for open discussion, but are looking for affirmation from people who already agree with them.)Oh-tell-me-34w8e6

I’ve been wondering a bit about how much this affects my daily life, the things I write, my relationships. This people-pleasing thing is really rooted in fear, I think. Fear of what people will think of me if I don’t comply to their opinions or standards.

But you can’t get very close to other people if you simply put on a them-like mask for a bit, or if you please everyone. You might have fewer disagreements or “discussions” but not authentic friendships. Perhaps this is why so many relationships are so superficial.

For those who write, putting on masks can affect the authenticity of the work. We live in a weird conundrum where we create things that will then be read and either appreciated or despised by the audience.

I find myself wondering how different people will react to something I write, whether people I know or potential agents or publishers or readers. Sometimes, I have made changes based on these wonderings, rather than staying entirely true to the story I was telling. I think a lot of writers do, whether it is trying to please a certain audience or hit a publishing trend or wondering how that mega-conservative aunt might react to your LGBT character.
For me, I am trying to be true to the story and true to myself more, in life and in writing. I think authenticity always rings true, and people gravitate towards that. Don’t be afraid to buck the trend or defy the genre or unsettle that aunt. In some ways, I suppose we must consider the audience and the genre. But don’t let it hold you or your writing back. Write the stories you want to write. Be the person you truly are. Whoever doesn’t like it, can just keep walking.

Overthinking the Little Trouble Spots and Writer’s Block

I am a nerd, and I love world-building. I love coming up with all the little details and why the world is the way it is in my stories. But sometimes it can kill my writing.

inception_2I have been stuck on a scene in my latest WIP for a couple weeks now. The story is a sci-fi space adventure set 250 years in the future, and so there are a lot of details I have been considering as I am going along. I got to a point where I was trying to explain why something was a certain way, but I hadn’t figured it out yet. It didn’t fully make sense in the social structure I’d come up with so far.

I have run into trouble like this before, and I’ve found that getting stumped on world-building in the first draft is a little silly. On my own part. I am still figuring a lot of things out in this draft, like most first drafts I think.

I’ve decided to move forward and deal with those details later, once I’ve discovered more about the story and the novel-world through plot movement.

The thing is, we throw out a ton of stuff from the first draft anyway. Often the setting itself completely changes or evolves over time. Things tend to change significantly during subsequent drafts. Characters get dropped or combined, society gets made darker or less, or technology advances more, or a rural setting suddenly makes for sense than urban. Spend a lot of time aching over it, and it will probably get cut or changed.

Maybe not, you’re right.

writers-block-but-for-memes_o_1064153My point is: don’t waste your time and headaches on the first attack. You don’t need to get it all right and figured out just yet. Keep the plot moving (and the writing moving). The quicker you get the story down, the quicker you can figure out what needs dropped and what needs expanded.

Don’t be afraid to leave a plot hole there to deal with in the second draft, so you can just move forward.

I spent waaaay too much time editing and re-editing and pounding out details as I was writing my first novel. I changed nearly all of it in later drafts. Sure, the experience helped me figure out some things that stayed, but a lot of it was a waste of time. Or at least, poorly executed time. I don’t really think any writing time is a waste entirely.

But there is nothing wrong with learning to be more efficient, right?

Don’t sweat it too much the first go round. Just get that story on paper. A complete story will give you a lot better perspective for dealing with the trouble spots.

Happy writing!